Macro Time Lapse: Great Barrier Reef

Macro coral images by Daniel Stupin of Microworld Photography. Scroll down for video.

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Daniel Stoupin‘s stunning reef timelapse consists of over 15,000 macro shots; each frame is 3-12 images merged together.

Despite the gorgeous footage, this view shows a near-microscopic oceanic battleground. Daniel explains:

By day most hard corals are cute and colorful. Their polyps coexist with their symbiotic algae and depend on light for nutrients produced by their photosynthetic symbionts. By night these polyps open up like flowers, but unlike flowers they turn into fierce predators, extend their tentacles, and sometimes invert their guts to digest the crap out of everything that they can reach. Coral colonies have to compete for substrate with other species, sometimes in violent battles. The winner is usually the species who digests faster or can resist digestive enzymes of the attackers better.

Enjoy the video:

Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

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See the World Differently with Beautiful Photomicrography

Before you read this, pause and look at your hand.  Imagine that you could see ten, one hundred, a thousand times higher resolution.  What would your hand look like?  What world the world look like?

Photomicrography, the science of imaging through microscopes, is a window into an exotic world.

To illustrate the beautiful new perspectives made possible by advanced imaging technology, I’ve compiled some exquisite images from Nikon Small World.  Can you identify them? You’re doing well if you get even one correct. Answers are at the bottom of this post.

1.

cricket tongue

2.

tapeworm head

3.

compound shrimp eye

4.

red ink mixed with acid, heated

5.

feather of a dove

6.

"fruit fly eye"

7.

"marine diatom"

8.

"moth wing"

9.

"crystallized mix of resorcinal, methylene blue and sulphur"

10.

"fossilized shells"

11.

"soap bubbles"

12.

"wrinkled photoresist"

13.

"actin bundles" image

14.

"cup fern longitudinal section" image

15.

"water crystal" image

16.

"bird of paradise seed"

17.

"Butterfly egg on pink powderpuff bud"

18.

microchip

19.

sand magnified 4x

20.

"mushroom gills"

Answers:

1. Cricket tongue by Christian Gautier

2. Head of a tapeworm by Vigar Zaman

3. Shrimp eye by John Douglass

4. Red ink mixed with acid, heated by Carlos Jimenez Perez

5. Feather of a dove by Leonard Cannone

6. Fruit fly eye by Guichuan Huo

7. Marine diatom by Wim Van Egmond

8. Moth wing by Charles Krebs

9. Crystallized mix of resorcinal, methylene blue and sulphur by John Hart

10. Fossilized shells by Wim van Egmond

11. Soap bubbles by Viktor Syorka

12. Wrinkled photoresist by Pedro Barrios-Perez (what is a photoresist?)

13. Actin bundles by Dennis Breitsprecher

14. Cup fern, longitudinal rhizome section by Stephen Lowry

15. Water crystal by Raul Gonzalez

16. Bird of paradise (plant) seed by Viktor Syorka

17. Butterfly egg on pink powderpuff bud by David Millard

18. Microchip by Alfred Paseika

19. Sand by Yanping Wang

20. Mushroom gills by Charles Krebs

A few more awesome images that may surprise you:

Pollen grains by Shirley Owens

Lysine by Nikolai Vsevolodov

Small intestine of mouse by Paul Appleton

All images sourced from Nikon’s Small World.

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#lifebonus

What makes you excited to be alive?

Open-ended questions like the one above light me up.   I personally love it when people lay out the ideas they are passionate about and then explore how and why those ideas matter.  Would you like to be asked “What’s the most curious thing you have discovered recently?” more often?  I would. Hopefully this post will inspire you to surprise someone with a delightful chance to share who they are and enlighten you in the process. It’s relatively easy: ask a good question.

About 48 hours ago I sent the following email to a few friends:

Hey!  I hope you’re well!  This is for fun/how I’ve decided to keep Friday Fresh.

Reply inline and I will subsequently send fresh shit from my end.  It’s important to note that when you successfully answer these challenges you, friend, get a life bonus!!  Seriously, it will make your day rock.

– Most interesting thing you’ve discovered in the past 10 days (if it’s too hard to choose, share up to 3)
– Most beautiful image/video from past month
– Best meal or food from the past month
– Did you learn a new word in the past month?  Share.  If not, go find one.
– Funniest/most entertaining.  “Find out what is to be taken seriously and laugh at the rest” -Herman Hesse
That’s all.  You have 48 hours to reply.  Good luck!
For fun/inbox entertainment
Amy
This is more than inbox entertainment.  I think it actually helps me get to know a person along the lines of what’s important and how he or she spends free time.   What matters to you?
“Such as are your constant thoughts, such will be the character of your mind” Marcus Aurelius
From here on out, this post is crowd-sourced.  Every video, image, link, quote and fact was “recruited” by the above email.    I hope you enjoy this fresh broad collective perspective that materialized over the weekend.
  • Most Beautiful Image/Video

Creative tech

a story for tomorrow

Rediscovered classic

que bella

there and back: space

NASA releases epic panorama of night sky made from 18,000 images.

  • Most interesting thing you’ve learned/discovered

Nat Geo’s Friday Fact: A hurricane weighs as much as 160 million rhinos!

exp.lore.com

How to divide a square equally into 5 parts.

“Triggered by Brené Brown’s talk about shame I discovered some things about myself.
I discovered that fears and insecurities can be layered and that if you’ve successfully stripped away one layer you may discover another one underneath.
Unfortunately, I am not always aware which fears and insecurities I really have.”

“That the technology for taking a blood sugar reading on an iPhone is being developed.”

ChronoZoom beta is out!

Sexually rejected mice turn to booze.

“Offer a male fruit fly a choice between food soaked in alcohol and its nonalcoholic equivalent, and his decision will depend on whether he’s mated recently or been rejected by a female. Flies that have been given the cold shoulder are more likely to go for the booze, researchers have found. It’s the first discovery, in fruit flies, of a social interaction that influences future behavior.”

Wild lions up close with the Beetle Cam.

Shark teeth are essentially modified scales and evolved from skin, not bones (right, sharks are cartilaginous; they don’t have bones).

“No matter how much you plan, you’ll always face something totally unexpected.”

True.  Perspective on embracing the unanticipated with delight from a different person:

“I have no idea where I’m going, I’m totally conflicted and I’ve never been happier or more flipped out.”

  • New words

awesomeness 

bitumen – the pronunciation is awesome. It’s a synonym for asphalt.

buckram – 1. A coarse cotton fabric heavily sized with glue, used for stiffening garments and in bookbinding. 2. Archaic Rigid formality

coqui – teeny nocturnal frog 

dongleflump – “not sure about a new word but I make lots up, like this one.” Define for yourself, world!

entelechy -In the philosophy of Aristotle, the condition of a thing whose essence is fully realized

LTE – (4G phone network) means Long Term Evolution

pedantic – overly concerned with minute details or formalisms

plumbeo- (Spanish word)  sad, slow, opaque.  “It is like the colour of the sky in winter.”

sycophant – A person who acts obsequiously toward someone in order to gain advantage; a servile flatterer.

wish – “I had forgotten what it meant.  I know now.”

What is the last new word you learned?

  • Best recent nomnoms

I ate fruit roll-ups with a girl I had just net a few days before, she looked at me and smiled and I felt like a teenager.

mom’s chicken pot pie; a private restaurant in Bogota, Columbia; Portuguese food: Rice with octopus and red wine; dinner with Hans Rosling on Wednesday; sukiyaki; Silk City Diner pork tacos; pork chop at vinotinis; fish tacos at Tacombi NYC; some beef mince thing at a party (I have no idea what it was); oven roasted Red Drum fish fillet with kai lan; butternut squash, pasta and a preserved lemon saffron sauce; dinner at an Australian restaurant near Amsterdam; Brenda’s soul food; dinner in Philly two weekends ago on a pitstop before I came home to Switzerland.

Catching up with friends and sharing stories and challenging each other to think critically on a wide range of topics.

  • funny+entertaining

“Went to my grandmothers 80th birthday party, which for most 80 year olds means a nice little party with family and friends. Now for my grandmother, who happens to be the owner of 4 Gentleman’s clubs in NYC..her friends are well interesting.”

Demoreel for visual effects studio The Mill

“If camping outside is so great, then why are all of the bugs trying to get into my house. “- Jim Gaffigan

When was the last time you got this excited when you heard a new song? 🙂

“My kids listening to Toy Dolls”

Where’s _why?

Portraits imagining a baby’s future profession.

Books on Amazon:

That is all.  John Hodgman

The Fan“, Eric Bogosian (comedy)

  • anything else?

“48 days until I graduate from Penn State. No sure exactly what’s going to happen in the next 48, but I know it’s going to be crazy.”

What are you doing with the next 48 days of your life?

Try something different.  Do new.  Ask open-ended questions.  Instigate surprise.  Play.  Explore the world and minds around you. And feel free to answer the questions below or post your own question in the comments section.  Or tweet interestingnesses with the hash tag #lifebonus to @amyleerobinson.

– Most interesting thing you’ve discovered in the past 10 days (if it’s too hard to choose, share up to 3)
– Most beautiful image/video from past month
– Best meal or food from the past month
– Did you learn a new word in the past month?  Share.  If not, go find one.
– Funniest/most entertaining.  “Find out what is to be taken seriously and laugh at the rest” -Herman Hesse

Kudos to Antonella Broglia (Madrid), Jon Yeo (Melbourne), John Eberhart (Huntsville, USA), Dave Lim (Singapore), Marconi Pereria (Rio de Janeiro), Lisa Nicole Bell (Los Angeles), Steve Garaguilo (Zurich), Hugo Schotman (Zurich), Evan Grant (London),  Brad Garland (Huntsville), Philip Kovacs (Huntsville), Dylan Finelli (Boston), Zach Zimbler (Penn State), Lionel Felix (Austin TX), Dan Jacob (Toronto), Shreenath Regunathan (San Francisco), and Sean Gourley (San Francisco).  This post is friend-sourced.

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Spark Google+

Google+ is fresh.  I like the ability to curate degrees of filter bubbles. For example, I put everyone in the friend circle and some people in “TED” and “intelligence”.

Hangout.

I am stoked about soon inviting the intelligence circle to a spontaneous gathering.  Think – we could all watch the same TEDtalk in different locations – yet still together – then virtually hang out and discuss.  It’s like Skype, created by Google.

Spark.

Default interests (racecars, recipes, fashion) are easily overcome by searching for anything.  Here are the first couple terms I chose and notable results from the first page of results:

1.  “ideas”  ideas cause ideas

2.  “complex biology” biology of the creative mind

3.  “infographic”  how does a hybrid car actually work? 

I am impressed.

This is an expansion of the social network which already exists in your inbox.  It’s intuitive, which makes me curious to explore its functionality.   I’m excited to play with circles of friends and keep in touch at a distance in a more human way.

Go Google!

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What are you passionate about?

Yesterday I was asked “what are you passionate about?”  Refreshing.  And told to answer in 100 words or less.  Interesting challenge.

This question in the TEDGlobal application catechism caught my attention.  At first I scoffed.  How can I capture my zest in 100 words..I need a thousand, ten thousand.. and then I began to write. 

Scoff turns to intrigue as I realize this is a conversation with a quiet comrade, not a monologue.  Who am I, what fuels me is the question.  Introduce, don’t preach.  Outline my horizon.

I think high and wide and a hurricane of vocabulary in strange grammatical structure erupts from my brain.   Thoughts of thousands of words melt into hundreds, then dozens.  This challenge poises an opportunity for precise creative thinking.  As I progress in my answer I am captured by the notion that my initial reaction has morphed into a beautiful realization. 

I used the 100 words to create a chromosome of passion.  This is an outline of me, not the complete expression.  In this attempt to densely pack  myself into 100 words I found, surprisingly, that my passion required just four.  And I am delighted to share them with you.

Question:  What are you passionate about?

“Curiosity.  Endless exploration and perpetual discovery. History, etymology, literature (Seneca, Voltaire, Nietzsche+), scientific theory, travel, the human mind…My greatest curiosity is consciousness and how “I” exists.  I am obsessed with systems and complexity. Interdisciplinarity fuels my revelry in reality’s infinite variety.  Bilateral symmetry, philharmonic sound, fractals, posture, creativity, the wild..adamantly I focus and refocus my perception of the world and myself.  A dynamic innovative mind am I who lives for both the unexpected surprise and long developed accomplishment. In 100 words I need but four to tell you:  My passion is life.”

We should all be asked this more frequently.  Have a go, what are you passionate about?

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Diary of Ambidexterity

A musician at TEDxAtlanta taught himself to play guitar with his left hand after a nerve affliction made it impossible for him to continue playing with his right.   Becoming ambidextrous is a monumentally difficult undertaking.  I know because I have taught  myself to do it as well.

Just days before the conference I wrote the following pages, pictured at  the bottom of this post.  I shared them with Billy after his final performance.  Years I have practiced to reach this moderate level of dual articulation.

I am vibrant with life and curious and intrigued to the nth degree.  The notes convey this so I have decided to transcribe their contents for you:

Page 1:  LEFT HAND.

“13 April 2010.  Existing here fawning over reality.  Is this life real?  It is, silly rhetorical question.  What I mean to imply is a sense of wonder regarding what the world brings to the table.  Human beings are astonishingly wonderful creatures.  They recognize and respond to passion.  It moves and compells the interesting lot of us into curiosity.  I am driven beyond measure and comprehension in directions that seem at the whim of creative impulse.  Where does it come from?  How does curiosity exist?  It fuels me.  That’s a potential book title.  Tangents.  What is to be said of them?  This ambidextrous endeavor in attempt to expand utilization of this one body with two hands, one typically the malnourished sibling of its dominant counterpart.  I have two hands, I should be able to use them with equal finesse.  This page has taken about thirty minutes to write.  It is my finest specimen of left-handed writing to date.  Indeed, my left hand, forearm, and fingers feel exhausted, like my legs when I run a 10K.  Intriguing relativity.”

Page 2:  RIGHT HAND.

“13 April 2010.  I compose this page after writing the one to the right with my left hand.  Look at these scripts.  Hell, even check the speed.  I will take a photo of these two pages.  Looking now it seems as though the next page was composed by your author under drugs or a bumpy road.  I attest I have not left my bed and that both are by the same human being.  It took so much more attention, focus, concentration, a stronger grip on both the pen and task at hand.  I recall my first attempts at ambidexterity.  Frustration was the word.  I read in Gray’s Anatomy that most people have a lateral curvature of the spine – to the right – and reverse in left-handed specimens.  Fuel for the fire of achieving perfect alignment.  Posture, balance, skeletal frame refinement – these are paramount in my scale of importance.  It is one of those “still in my head will be conveyable to rest of world in due time.” An underlying structure ties in – the systemic approach to energy’s interaction with itself – and passionate inquiry meets curiosity once and forever again, taking me endlessly into realms unknown.  Beautiful. (This page – five to ten minutes).”

This is the first time I have directly shared my personal notes with the public.  Enjoy this glance into my thoughts to myself.

I wonder what our taking on of difficulty says about who we are.  I wonder what the degree to which you laboriously follow passion in pursuit of the difficult says about who you are.

Be Inspired,

Amy

Notes
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Grilling over Rosemary Wood

I was jogging the other day and ran by a rosemary bush a meter tall thrown out with trash.

I replanted it and the bush is today pronounced deceased.  So now I have some Rosemary wood to grill with.  It is a perennial herb with 1 inch (2.5 cm) thick limbs .  And once it dries out a bit we are going to cook over it.  Hickory smoked food tastes good.  Rosemary smoked food..oh man sounds amazing.  I will let you know how it goes.

Side note related to life and the outdoors, I have been taking photos of a specific garden since early April. It is turning into somewhat of a masterpiece of photographic flow series.  First every two weeks and now it seems every couple of days new greenery bursts into vibrant bloom.  From barely broken winter ground to a four foot tall mesh of life.  Changing bright and soft colors and hues and depth of green. Green into POW! white, yellow, purple, burgundy.

What does life do to an area of Earth that it inhabits?  A hydrologic system (of organisms) mediates a bit of air and soil [look into that statement].  It changes the chemical composition of its environment, making complex molecules and a variety of by-products that themselves fuel an evolving, increasingly complex biosphere.

Periodic cycles of ebb and flow in energy availability drive a dynamic system to “produce” (that is, exist).  The structure of the affecting cycles effects the overall ecology, which itself incorporates the functions which affect its description.  I find this intriguing.  I think about this subject in many ways, striving for pure curiosity and inquisitiveness.

Along the way I end up with systems affecting (or as an effect of – or both -) my thought process.  Such is the case in my deciding to document the growth of a garden.  Here, it is so that I can look back and see, differently.  It’s a pseudo-experiment that tests the hypothesis that the end product will inspire something new.  Which could be just some photos.  Conversely, it might aid thoughts about evolving ecological systems.

As great books inspire ideas, thoughtful intrigue can incite literature recollections and research collaborations that happen to arise alongside the stimulus.  The stimulus of instantaneously re-seeing a garden grow from bare to bearing.  It falls under a nameless category of curiosity to which I ascribe the sentiment of “Hm, that’s interesting”.   I nurture many off-the-wall undertakings with this principle.  Now then, you have wasted minutes reading my eccentric labors and musings.  Go along and pursue your passion, no matter the obscurity. Remember that gravity was considered ridiculous when Galileo first thought of it.

Here is one photograph I have taken along the way.  Sharing enthusiasm for life’s subtle details.  -Amy

Aquilegia (also called Columbine) blooms in mid-April 2010
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