Macro Time Lapse: Great Barrier Reef

Macro coral images by Daniel Stupin of Microworld Photography. Scroll down for video.

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Daniel Stoupin‘s stunning reef timelapse consists of over 15,000 macro shots; each frame is 3-12 images merged together.

Despite the gorgeous footage, this view shows a near-microscopic oceanic battleground. Daniel explains:

By day most hard corals are cute and colorful. Their polyps coexist with their symbiotic algae and depend on light for nutrients produced by their photosynthetic symbionts. By night these polyps open up like flowers, but unlike flowers they turn into fierce predators, extend their tentacles, and sometimes invert their guts to digest the crap out of everything that they can reach. Coral colonies have to compete for substrate with other species, sometimes in violent battles. The winner is usually the species who digests faster or can resist digestive enzymes of the attackers better.

Enjoy the video:

Slow Life from Daniel Stoupin on Vimeo.

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It’s human nature to want to explore

I have mad respect for RedBull, an energy drink company turned powerhouse of epic. RedBull supports adventure. They embrace risk. They empower people to break bones and boundaries. Here’s their latest video, which is awesome.

I hear you like the wild ones, honey, is that true? Yes, yes it is.  I curate amazing, wild things from Red Bull on a new Facebook page called Be More Epic.

Transcript:

“I think it’s human nature to want to explore.

Find your line and go beyond it.

The only limit is the one you set yourself.”

Images brought to you by RedBull:

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See the World Differently with Beautiful Photomicrography

Before you read this, pause and look at your hand.  Imagine that you could see ten, one hundred, a thousand times higher resolution.  What would your hand look like?  What world the world look like?

Photomicrography, the science of imaging through microscopes, is a window into an exotic world.

To illustrate the beautiful new perspectives made possible by advanced imaging technology, I’ve compiled some exquisite images from Nikon Small World.  Can you identify them? You’re doing well if you get even one correct. Answers are at the bottom of this post.

1.

cricket tongue

2.

tapeworm head

3.

compound shrimp eye

4.

red ink mixed with acid, heated

5.

feather of a dove

6.

"fruit fly eye"

7.

"marine diatom"

8.

"moth wing"

9.

"crystallized mix of resorcinal, methylene blue and sulphur"

10.

"fossilized shells"

11.

"soap bubbles"

12.

"wrinkled photoresist"

13.

"actin bundles" image

14.

"cup fern longitudinal section" image

15.

"water crystal" image

16.

"bird of paradise seed"

17.

"Butterfly egg on pink powderpuff bud"

18.

microchip

19.

sand magnified 4x

20.

"mushroom gills"

Answers:

1. Cricket tongue by Christian Gautier

2. Head of a tapeworm by Vigar Zaman

3. Shrimp eye by John Douglass

4. Red ink mixed with acid, heated by Carlos Jimenez Perez

5. Feather of a dove by Leonard Cannone

6. Fruit fly eye by Guichuan Huo

7. Marine diatom by Wim Van Egmond

8. Moth wing by Charles Krebs

9. Crystallized mix of resorcinal, methylene blue and sulphur by John Hart

10. Fossilized shells by Wim van Egmond

11. Soap bubbles by Viktor Syorka

12. Wrinkled photoresist by Pedro Barrios-Perez (what is a photoresist?)

13. Actin bundles by Dennis Breitsprecher

14. Cup fern, longitudinal rhizome section by Stephen Lowry

15. Water crystal by Raul Gonzalez

16. Bird of paradise (plant) seed by Viktor Syorka

17. Butterfly egg on pink powderpuff bud by David Millard

18. Microchip by Alfred Paseika

19. Sand by Yanping Wang

20. Mushroom gills by Charles Krebs

A few more awesome images that may surprise you:

Pollen grains by Shirley Owens

Lysine by Nikolai Vsevolodov

Small intestine of mouse by Paul Appleton

All images sourced from Nikon’s Small World.

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